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Ed Pendoski

An Idea to Think About.

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Some of you are mentioning that it makes sense some of these kids to move from small weak programs with the lack of a decent coaching have a shot at real success.  But for several, not all, of the high profile transfers/freshman move-ins they comes from a districts with a decent programs and a knowledgeable active coaches.   Yeah the program they left may not have been perineal top 20 and the coach may not be considered a top name in Indiana coaching, but they are not lacking in the numbers, coaching department, and have some success individually and/or team wise.  So for many of these guys I can’t trust that the reason they left was due to a deplorable practice partners or a elementary level coach. I’d rather some just call a spade a spade and just say those guys wanted a few elite level training partners around their weight (maybe even some college coaches watching due to those kid), were sold on the top coaches reputation, and they like the idea of possible being part a top 10 team in state. Heck some of the “average” transfers are doing the same thing cause the parents usually think that’s all the kids lacking to get to the next level too.   Some people may not like those reasons, but its more honest than to act like several of these talented kids were somehow under poor conditions at their original locations.  

 

I do do also agree that the ability to supplement your training by being close to an academy or a private trainer can really help you.  I’ve see that this extra bonus sometimes helps to keep you at your district school, but other times the connection you develop to those top level academy kids ends up attracting you to their school for the HS season.  

Edited by MattM

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3 hours ago, Mattyb said:

Seems as though in today’s liberal society we our being hit in the face with movements. These movements have the purpose to save people, places, or things. 

I propose the “Not here!” movement. This movement is 100 percent do not transfer. If a stud (8th grade and up) moves into your school district, you make them sit a season.

“But wait” you say... “what if my AD doesn’t let me sit them?” To that, we at the “Not Here” movement say... “your the coach, you set the line up. Put them on JV for the season.”

I propose that all coaches that feel as if transfers are “killing” are sport, join this “Not Here” movement! With this said, how many coaches are willing to do there part in putting an end to this transfer thing?? Anyone.... anyone... ???? 

Of couse I do not support the movement that I made up. The thing is this... what good does it do to talk about this when not one coach turns away a stud??? No need to talk about it if nobody is will to take action.

Anonymous letters to the IHSAA don’t seem to be working either! 

This is my point... it is what it is. If we as a wrestling community see a neighboring school’s program failing, then we need to step up and help when we can. That’s gonna to help keep wrestling alive in communities way more than harping on 10 or do transfers statewide per year.

All this talk and no solutions is solving nothing. 

Just my opinion. 

#NotHere! (Who’s with me!!!!)

 

 

Please GTFO with that "liberal society" garbage that has absolutely nothing to do with the discussion at hand

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45 minutes ago, greco165 said:

Please GTFO with that "liberal society" garbage that has absolutely nothing to do with the discussion at hand

So no need to chime in on anything until someone post the word “liberal”... ha!!!! 

I want to apologize for saying that the liberals have causes or movements. I guess that liberals don’t start movements! Wasn’t trying to make anyone mad. My bad, little buddy. I would like to apologize to the man who told me to GTFO, but I’m sure that I will never know who you are. Right one proud??? Lol

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3 minutes ago, Mattyb said:

So no need to chime in on anything until someone post the word “liberal”... ha!!!! 

I want to apologize for saying that the liberals have causes or movements. I guess that liberals don’t start movements! Wasn’t trying to make anyone mad. My bad, little buddy. I would like to apologize to the man who told me to GTFO, but I’m sure that I will never know who you are. Right one proud??? Lol

RIGHT!!

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29 minutes ago, Mattyb said:

So no need to chime in on anything until someone post the word “liberal”... ha!!!! 

I want to apologize for saying that the liberals have causes or movements. I guess that liberals don’t start movements! Wasn’t trying to make anyone mad. My bad, little buddy. I would like to apologize to the man who told me to GTFO, but I’m sure that I will never know who you are. Right one proud??? Lol

You seem easily triggered for a conservative

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11 hours ago, maligned said:

In my opinion, it's the effects of technology and economic progress. With the advent of the internet and then social media, ideas/schedules/plans are shared more quickly and easily. And the average American family, with our nation's steady economic progress, has significantly more flexibility in their spending that allows for more camps and travel--and therefore a building of wrestling networks and an exposure to what's out there. Once you've got all the info of what's happening in wrestling, you've built your wrestling community network from a distance, and you've got that slightly more income and awareness of jobs available elsewhere--the leap to a family move is relatively quick and painless compared to 30 or 40 years ago. Then when a couple families do it, it's that much easier for others to follow suit.

We're getting more mobile on every level as a society--not less. It's happening on a national level in terms of populations in cities, for example. People are trickling away from all the big Midwest cities and landing in coastal or warm-weather or tech-oriented cities. I'm not sure what the smart answers are to the issues Coach P. raises. If we as a society are clearly migrating toward what's perceived to be bigger/better/smarter/hipper, it will be tough to slow the trend in high school wrestling. How do you build those arguments to families that "better" can actually mean bettering your community, being loyal, and growing as human beings in accomplishing what others say we can't?

I guess that I have never thought of it like that. You are right that it is much easier to just pick up and move now. I think that we are leading into a bigger picture of maybe adapting a different set up to our state....Do I dare say it? Classed wrestling. I would hate to see this happen but this could be where we are heading because of athletes leaving smaller programs to go to bigger ones. I think that it is already instilled in some minds that "for me to get better I have to train with so and so." This is happening over and over again. At the end, there really isn't a good answer for Coach Ps thought.

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9 hours ago, Y2CJ41 said:

No one pays that much to go to Indiana Tech. All private schools have a high sticker price, but give lots of grants and aid. You can go to Indiana Tech for the same amount as a state school.

On top of that very few Indiana kids going off to college are getting their school paid for due to wrestling. 

Your absolutely right. The amount of money in wrestling scholarships are just not even worth mentioning. Yes, For a highly rank wrestler, I’m sure they do fine. The rest well not so well. So academics is where things even out. Like I said use wrestling as a tool for college. When wrestling becomes the best tool is when academically you barely qualify for that school. And it’s a low acceptance rate( of students who qualify). But your been recruited by their wrestling program. That’s an A’s in your back pocket!!! If your transfer your kids make sure it’s for academics and a good environment. All that other nonsense doesn’t really matter. Talent is talent. Work is work. 

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40 minutes ago, brickfor6 said:

I guess that I have never thought of it like that. You are right that it is much easier to just pick up and move now. I think that we are leading into a bigger picture of maybe adapting a different set up to our state....Do I dare say it? Classed wrestling. I would hate to see this happen but this could be where we are heading because of athletes leaving smaller programs to go to bigger ones. I think that it is already instilled in some minds that "for me to get better I have to train with so and so." This is happening over and over again. At the end, there really isn't a good answer for Coach Ps thought.

I like having one class wrestling. At the end of the day it’s still an individual sport. Give me the top team in Indiana... they will not have all state champions. Yes dual meets are going to be hard to compete from a typical small school to a big program. So what, it’s all practice. Doesn’t matter until sectionals and so on. 

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Why bother trying to legislate or control the transfers?  If parents/students are willing to go through the effort of transferring to another school for the benefit of academics, sports, or extracurricular activities - I say let them go.  Why hold kids out for a year - they are 14-19 years old and only have 4 years to play sports.  Let them play.

The small schools will be okay.  Key points for a small school coach is to cultivate a good youth club - that will be your feeder in future years. And, make the program something that parents and kids want to be a part of.  It's the same as a workplace - if all you have is the job with no sense of belonging (via close-knit workgroup/friends, team-building, company mission that you believe in, etc).  If you have those in place, then I believe the local kids will want to be a part of it.  Sure, a few studs might move to another school - let them go and pursue what they are looking for...

I also think there will be those students that transfer AWAY from the big schools to smaller schools.  I see it happen currently with larger team sports.  Where the student may not be a starter for the large HS team, they may be viewed as a superstar on the smaller HS team.  Could happen (maybe already does?) with wrestling too.  If you're at Brownsburg, for instance, it's going to be very tough to crack the varsity lineup.  A wrestler transferring to a smaller local school could be their varsity star and get an opportunity that they couldn't otherwise get.

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19 minutes ago, base said:

I also think there will be those students that transfer AWAY from the big schools to smaller schools.  I see it happen currently with larger team sports.  Where the student may not be a starter for the large HS team, they may be viewed as a superstar on the smaller HS team.  Could happen (maybe already does?) with wrestling too.  If you're at Brownsburg, for instance, it's going to be very tough to crack the varsity lineup.  A wrestler transferring to a smaller local school could be their varsity star and get an opportunity that they couldn't otherwise get.

Great point! We have had multiple kids leave Avon to go to smaller schools. Those kids may have never cracked our line up here, but went on to be multi-year starters at other nearby smaller schools. They played football too. They would have never seen the field here. So.. yes it does happen both ways. We just don't talk about those guys because they are not the top talent.

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16 hours ago, Riley McClurg said:

I’m saying that it did not matter in Sliga’s case. It would not have mattered if he went to Spring Valley Community High School. He supplemented the vast majority of his training under your watch at CIA. His family was able to afford that monthly fee to get elite training. You were able to provide him with wrestlers like Michael Duckworth, Jackson Bratcher, Austin Neibarger, and let’s not forgot the bazillion private workouts that you were able to provide him with as a separate entity from Fishers HS. So, what I am saying is that Sliga is a bad example. Seth Riley attended the right school at the right time, and he followed Mitch’s footsteps to your academy. Did he benefit from Sliga? Heck yeah. So would have the other kids at any other high school he attended because of the time, effort, and money he spent to be under your training. 

I'm still confused, because to me it sounds like you're using examples that top kids transfering to 'power programs' is not good for the future of Indiana wrestling as a whole.

It didn't matter that Sliga stayed at Fishers.  If he would have transferred to a power school, he would have had a similar career.  And by staying at Fishers, he brought another Fishers kid's level up.  

I think that says two things.  It says that you can still be successful without transfering to a power school.  It also says that staying within your feeder program increases the chance of another athlete's development/enjoyment of the sport that might not happen otherwise.

You also brought up 3 other guys that did the exact same thing.  They stayed in their feeder system, helped grow their home school, and still had very successful careers.  Not sure if you could say HSE was not a power program.   They were quite competitive in Austin's years.

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11 hours ago, brickfor6 said:

At the end, there really isn't a good answer for Coach Ps thought.

There might be answers if we first had consensus that this is truly an issue that if not address, will have a negative impact on the future of our sport in our state.

I'm the Lorax.  I speak for the trees!

 

One suggestion that I've brought up with the coaches association is starting an Ethic Committee.  We should probably have a different name for it.  If there was a committee inside the coaches association that people could bring up situations happening.  The committee could then investigate.  If it's nothing, then nothing is done.  If it finds out misdoings then it can make it public.  Another big benefit of having an Ethics Committee could be to promote great things happening in our sport.  In the Carmel vs Warren dual a couple years ago we had a match on the JV mat.  Both kids had autism.  Might have been one of the greatest matches I've ever seen (with a score of like 19-17 and 8 lead changes.  It was pretty special).

Edited by Ed Pendoski

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16 hours ago, MattM said:

Some of you are mentioning that it makes sense some of these kids to move from small weak programs with the lack of a decent coaching have a shot at real success.  But for several, not all, of the high profile transfers/freshman move-ins they comes from a districts with a decent programs and a knowledgeable active coaches.   Yeah the program they left may not have been perineal top 20 and the coach may not be considered a top name in Indiana coaching, but they are not lacking in the numbers, coaching department, and have some success individually and/or team wise.  So for many of these guys I can’t trust that the reason they left was due to a deplorable practice partners or a elementary level coach. I’d rather some just call a spade a spade and just say those guys wanted a few elite level training partners around their weight (maybe even some college coaches watching due to those kid), were sold on the top coaches reputation, and they like the idea of possible being part a top 10 team in state. Heck some of the “average” transfers are doing the same thing cause the parents usually think that’s all the kids lacking to get to the next level too.   Some people may not like those reasons, but its more honest than to act like several of these talented kids were somehow under poor conditions at their original locations.  

 

I do do also agree that the ability to supplement your training by being close to an academy or a private trainer can really help you.  I’ve see that this extra bonus sometimes helps to keep you at your district school, but other times the connection you develop to those top level academy kids ends up attracting you to their school for the HS season.  

I'm referring to a situation where a kid moved to a place that ISN'T elite (def an upgrade and a well ran program) .. and if you knew the whole story you'd understand.. there is def ppl that transfer to chase titles but the there is also legit transfers that happen due to incompetent coaching and there schools lack of care towards the situation... reading wrestling moves from a 1988 instructional manual isn't coaching or blind folding kids during practice (yes i'm not kidding)  and if my kid was subjected to the things that have been going on in this particular situation I def wouldn't hesitate. Especially when the same coach was fired from other programs.. why should kids suffer just to appease a school's needs... if the school doesn't give a crap about the wrestling team then why should ppl stick around to get inferior leadership. 

Edited by FCFIGHTER170

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12 minutes ago, Ed Pendoski said:

There might be answers if we first had consensus that this is truly an issue that if not address, will have a negative impact on the future of our sport in our state.

I'm the Lorax.  I speak for the trees!

 

One suggestion that I've brought up with the coaches association is starting an Ethic Committee.  We should probably have a different name for it.  If there was a committee inside the coaches association that people could bring up situations happening.  The committee could then investigate.  If it's nothing, then nothing is done.  If it finds out misdoings then it can make it public.  Another big benefit of having an Ethics Committee could be to promote great things happening in our sport.  In the Carmel vs Warren dual a couple years ago we had a match on the JV mat.  Both kids had autism.  Might have been one of the greatest matches I've ever seen (with a score of like 19-17 and 8 lead changes.  It was pretty special).

Btw I totally understand your concerns and love the passion you have.. i'm just stating that there are transfers that are made for proper reasons. And from my posts above I don't think anybody would be happy about the treatment going on at a particular program.. it's sad what's going on there and the kids are suffering from it so I applaud anybody that can get their child out of that situation. 

Edited by FCFIGHTER170

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39 minutes ago, Ed Pendoski said:

I'm still confused, because to me it sounds like you're using examples that top kids transfering to 'power programs' is not good for the future of Indiana wrestling as a whole.

It didn't matter that Sliga stayed at Fishers.  If he would have transferred to a power school, he would have had a similar career.  And by staying at Fishers, he brought another Fishers kid's level up.  

I think that says two things.  It says that you can still be successful without transfering to a power school.  It also says that staying within your feeder program increases the chance of another athlete's development/enjoyment of the sport that might not happen otherwise.

You also brought up 3 other guys that did the exact same thing.  They stayed in their feeder system, helped grow their home school, and still had very successful careers.  Not sure if you could say HSE was not a power program.   They were quite competitive in Austin's years.

I don't think using Sliga at Fishers is a good example.   I think its contradictory to your point.   Fishers has had some solid teams throughout the years,   its like you're the assumption that Fishers sucked back then.  There still one of the biggest schools in state with a  lot of wrestlers coming out (plenty of workout partners), there facilities are good and they wrestled a challenging schedule.  Maybe they're  not competing for state champs, but they were very solid when he was there.   They also have access to some of the best clubs in Indianapolis.  I don't see why Sliga would have wanted to move.    Why don't you use the example of a wrestler from a  small school that has an inexperienced wrestling coach, poor facilities,  weak schedule,  low participation, or in summary the place a kid has little chance of improving or winning anything.  

  But you say you're the Lorax (my kids used to love the book) and speak for the trees, maybe the whole transfer thing might be healthy for the sport or the trees as your symbolically using as a metaphor.    To make my point, maybe we shouldn't try to use over controlled IHSAA rules to make sure that all the schools are healthy.  That's not real.   Maybe we should make sure that most of the trees are healthy and not waste resources on the sick ones.    There's schools with 2 to 3 wrestlers participating.  It is it really economically feasible to spend coaches salaries, procure equipment and travel just for the benefit of a couple of wrestlers.      Maybe if  a kid wanted to transfer from one of these schools, because he wants to be a healthy tree,  but  by keeping him in an environment where he cant progress, were ensuring he's not going to be an healthy tree.   Also, on a similar note. Why doesn't the ISHAA jump on the bandwagon and let small schools coop with each other to create bigger competitive teams.   To clarify,  School A and B don't have wrestling team but school C does.   Let kids from school A and B wrestle for School C.   Kid doesn't have to transfer,  he just has to drive a little bit for practice.    This would be one little piece in solving our transfer problem.

We're all Lorax's who speak for the trees,  we just have different Lorax ideas.

 

Edited by Wrestling Scholar

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57 minutes ago, Ed Pendoski said:

I'm still confused, because to me it sounds like you're using examples that top kids transfering to 'power programs' is not good for the future of Indiana wrestling as a whole.

It didn't matter that Sliga stayed at Fishers.  If he would have transferred to a power school, he would have had a similar career.  And by staying at Fishers, he brought another Fishers kid's level up.  

I think that says two things.  It says that you can still be successful without transfering to a power school.  It also says that staying within your feeder program increases the chance of another athlete's development/enjoyment of the sport that might not happen otherwise.

You also brought up 3 other guys that did the exact same thing.  They stayed in their feeder system, helped grow their home school, and still had very successful careers.  Not sure if you could say HSE was not a power program.   They were quite competitive in Austin's years.

I am saying that Sliga is apart of that outlier group that I was talking about. Transferring was never the thought process because his family could afford to spend there money at your place. His club coach (YOU) was traveling with him to national tournaments, cadet worlds, etc. Not his high school coach - YOU! Not every kid in the state can afford to supplement their training under THE Ed Pendoski, therefore, some utilize the open enrollment rule instead. 

As for helping the feeder program, what evidence do you have to prove? Lyle, Riley, Sliga, etc. were around the same age. You MAY have a point with Strueder as coming up in the “feeder program,” but he as well supplemented his training with you, Brady, & co. at CIA. When have we heard a big name out of Eastbrook since Jackson? Who has contended for a state title at Union County since Phillips and Duckworth? ALL of these guys are outliers to your theory due to the fact that they spent thousands and thousands of dollars over their years to supplement 3/4 of their training at a private academy that happened to be yours. 

So, now I am confused because all of your examples are what I stated in my first post - not everyone can afford $200-$300 a month plus the $25/hour private sessions you conducted with them as well. What do I think the elite wrestlers do that cannot afford a private academy like you ran? They utilize the open enrollment rule to go to a school with an elite room and established feeder system that has been proven successful - once again, just my theory. 

I mean no offense to these schools as I grew up taking licks from every kid that I mentioned. Great people with great families. Just trying to prove a point. 

Hopefully this clears up your confusion, P  

 

 

Edited by Riley McClurg

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"I am not calling you out, P, but we both know that Mitch Sliga spent 2x more time in CIA's room than he did Fishers. He did not need to go searching elsewhere to receive support or partners because you provided that to him through CIA, and he was in there on a year-round basis."

Yes, I know out of all of the comments, this struck me.  But I thought during season, wrestlers couldn't train with each other.  I ask because I know kids are not only training in Academies together but now it has morphed into kids training together at their schools.  Isn't this against IHSAA Policy? Asking for a friend.

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13 minutes ago, Clint Gard said:

"I am not calling you out, P, but we both know that Mitch Sliga spent 2x more time in CIA's room than he did Fishers. He did not need to go searching elsewhere to receive support or partners because you provided that to him through CIA, and he was in there on a year-round basis."

Yes, I know out of all of the comments, this struck me.  But I thought during season, wrestlers couldn't train with each other.  I ask because I know kids are not only training in Academies together but now it has morphed into kids training together at their schools.  Isn't this against IHSAA Policy? Asking for a friend.

Did not mean it like that - I trained alongside of the people named at CIA. Practices would run from March through September each year - then it gave kids time to get acclimated to their room and prepare for high school season. Poor choice of words on my end - Eddie did not violate any IHSAA sanctions or rules to my knowledge. 

So, you can tell your friend that was asking, Clint, that no IHSAA sanctions or rules were violated. 

Edited by Riley McClurg

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58 minutes ago, Wrestling Scholar said:

I don't think using Sliga at Fishers is a good example.   I think its contradictory to your point.   Fishers has had some solid teams throughout the years,   its like you're the assumption that Fishers sucked back then.  There still one of the biggest schools in state with a  lot of wrestlers coming out (plenty of workout partners), there facilities are good and they wrestled a challenging schedule.  Maybe they're  not competing for state champs, but they were very solid when he was there.   They also have access to some of the best clubs in Indianapolis.  I don't see why Sliga would have wanted to move.    Why don't you use the example of a wrestler from a  small school that has an inexperienced wrestling coach, poor facilities,  weak schedule,  low participation, or in summary the place a kid has little chance of improving or winning anything.  

  But you say you're the Lorax (my kids used to love the book) and speak for the trees, maybe the whole transfer thing might be healthy for the sport or the trees as your symbolically using as a metaphor.    To make my point, maybe we shouldn't try to use over controlled IHSAA rules to make sure that all the schools are healthy.  That's not real.   Maybe we should make sure that most of the trees are healthy and not waste resources on the sick ones.    There's schools with 2 to 3 wrestlers participating.  It is it really economically feasible to spend coaches salaries, procure equipment and travel just for the benefit of a couple of wrestlers.      Maybe if  a kid wanted to transfer from one of these schools, because he wants to be a healthy tree,  but  by keeping him in an environment where he cant progress, were ensuring he's not going to be an healthy tree.   Also, on a similar note. Why doesn't the ISHAA jump on the bandwagon and let small schools coop with each other to create bigger competitive teams.   To clarify,  School A and B don't have wrestling team but school C does.   Let kids from school A and B wrestle for School C.   Kid doesn't have to transfer,  he just has to drive a little bit for practice.    This would be one little piece in solving our transfer problem.

We're all Lorax's who speak for the trees,  we just have different Lorax ideas.

 

This is a great solution, Lake Central does this right now with our football program.  3 middle schools feed into the high school and for some reason 2 out of the 3 the past couple of years could not get more than 15 kids out (crazy I know, 4000 kids in the middle schools, cant get 30 at one middle school to play ball).  So they combined them into one team, where they practice and play together and now they have a solid football team.  Gets all the kids that want to play an opportunity for minimal travel costs (schools are 15 minutes away and corp buses them).  Win win for all involved

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46 minutes ago, Riley McClurg said:

Did not mean it like that - I trained alongside of the people named at CIA. Practices would run from March through September each year - then it gave kids time to get acclimated to their room and prepare for high school season. Poor choice of words on my end - Eddie did not violate any IHSAA sanctions or rules to my knowledge. 

So, you can tell your friend that was asking, Clint, that no IHSAA sanctions or rules were violated. 

Thanks for the clarification Riley!  I don't think Ed violated anything.  Just struck me funny and brings to light an issue that I know is out there with others.

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23 hours ago, Riley McClurg said:

As for the names listed on the thread, I can tell you I see them wrestling on a consistent basis in the off-season with teams that are not their HS - whether its Disney Duals, VB Duals, etc. They are seizing opportunities provided to them by other schools or clubs (Outlaws or someone like Penn or B. South taking wildcards to Disney). I am sure they are expanding their training environment.

My old Polish brain is still confused.  

We both admit Sliga stayed in his home school (this one is measurable, his transcripts prove us right). 

We both agree that the guys in his room benefit from him not transferring to a power program (this on is not quite as measurable, but I'm assuming you don't think it hurt Riley by having Sliga say "come wrestle and you can come to an academy with me if you want). 

I'm assuming we both agree he had a successful high school career. 

We both agree that he supplemented his training while staying in his home school.  Is that correct?

But we also agree that most (if not all) of the guys on the thread about big transfers supplement their training somewhere else besides they home school, correct?

Here's my opinion about the schools you mentioned (definitely not measurable).  Because Bratcher and Duckworth and Cody Phillips did not leave and go to a power program they helped their small schools do this:

  • 3rd Place Match - Ben Stewart (Cathedral) 41-2 won by decision over Luke Elliott (Eastbrook) 40-4 (Dec 7-4)

and 

  • 3rd Place Match - Jack Eiteljorge (Carmel) 40-3 won by fall over Tucker Coffman (Union County) 43-8 (Fall 1:51)

I'm confused on what you're saying because I read you say that Sliga had success and he included others with his success (in his home school).  You said that he is a bad example because he supplemented his training elsewhere.  But you also said that most (if not all) of the guys on the big transfers thread already supplements their training elsewhere?  They why do they need to transfer at all when they would help the sport as a whole by increasing the popularity of wrestling in a small/weaker program and they can still be successful because they can supplement their training.

My real question that comes from the start of this thread is that does having the strongest kids from small/weak programs transferring to power programs have a long term effect on our sport as a whole.

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3 hours ago, base said:

Why bother trying to legislate or control the transfers?  If parents/students are willing to go through the effort of transferring to another school for the benefit of academics, sports, or extracurricular activities - I say let them go.  Why hold kids out for a year - they are 14-19 years old and only have 4 years to play sports.  Let them play.

The small schools will be okay.  Key points for a small school coach is to cultivate a good youth club - that will be your feeder in future years. And, make the program something that parents and kids want to be a part of.  It's the same as a workplace - if all you have is the job with no sense of belonging (via close-knit workgroup/friends, team-building, company mission that you believe in, etc).  If you have those in place, then I believe the local kids will want to be a part of it.  Sure, a few studs might move to another school - let them go and pursue what they are looking for...

I also think there will be those students that transfer AWAY from the big schools to smaller schools.  I see it happen currently with larger team sports.  Where the student may not be a starter for the large HS team, they may be viewed as a superstar on the smaller HS team.  Could happen (maybe already does?) with wrestling too.  If you're at Brownsburg, for instance, it's going to be very tough to crack the varsity lineup.  A wrestler transferring to a smaller local school could be their varsity star and get an opportunity that they couldn't otherwise get.

I agree, let parents make that choice without penalizing the kid. Reality is it happens and it will. I’ll rather have it in the open instead of trying to me sneaky about it. What is not fair is the some get away with it and some don’t. I don’t agree that you need to go to power program to have success. My opinion only, but that doesn’t mean I want to control or prevent others from doing what they believe is best. 

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