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TheGenerealsDad

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  1. I guess Heads Up Football is the scam I thought it was. http://boston.cbslocal.com/2016/07/27/report-nfl-usa-football-trumpeted-false-data-about-protecting-kids-from-concussions-and-injuries/
  2. Just curious and jealous - how do you fund that? Are these guys unpaid, paid by the club, or school funded? Are they teachers or "outside" coaches? Whatever it is, it is super impressive.
  3. Can you give a typical schedule for the RTC? Is it just warm up, work a little on technique from guest, then wrestle live? What is the typical end time? Was also wondering what the numbers would be in the 95 - 110 lb range? Thank you
  4. I like the sitting out a year to not lose a year of eligibility take on this. May be over thinking that one.
  5. Strongly consider having your middle school wear fight shorts and compression shirts instead of singlets and spend the money to make them something they want to wear. We saw our numbers increase by approximately 20% just by changing the uniform. Also have the uniforms ready before the season starts so your returning wrestlers can have them to wear and show off - tell them to wear them to PE and around school. If you can get a teacher on staff who can recruit during PE class pre-season, that helps a lot also. I highly recommend Wrestling Addix, but plan well in advance to make sure you have it early. Most kids will buy their own shorts and shirts to keep if they are nice. If you can afford an initial investement and then sell to the kids who want to buy at cost, you should come close to getting your money back.
  6. Was reading through Joe McFarland's bio for some reason and ran across this: Formerly the head wrestling coach at Indiana University (1990-92), McFarland produced one of the most impressive first-year improvements in Big Ten Conference history when he guided the Hoosiers to a perfect 14-0 dual meet record in 1989-90, the program's first undefeated season since 1946. IU placed eighth at the NCAA Championships that season and claimed runner-up honors at the Big Ten Championships. Indiana was also the only unbeaten team in NCAA Division I in 1989-90 and reached the No. 5 national ranking in the final dual-meet listing by Amateur Wrestling News. McFarland produced three All-Americans and three Big Ten champions and was named the 1990 Big Ten Conference Coach of the Year. I don't remember that for some reason and was shocked to see that was even possible. I don't recall IU being that good ever. Two questions - did McFarland just walk into a can't miss opportunity and how did IU let him get away after that?
  7. I can't stop wondering what was going on at the high school practices that would be so hard on his body. Was he wrestling kids who were too large? Who does he practice with daily now and how would they be different than the kids who were on his team as far as damaging his body? Or does he even practice daily or just show up and wrestle national tournaments? I would have bent over backward to keep him on the team - You only want to practice 2 days a week? No problem. Maybe there are good answers to those questions, but I think they will linger until more is known.
  8. I don't know, I think he said he won the Jr. Olympics in his second year of wrestling. I think he might have been ok without the abuse.
  9. I wasn't saying I didn't like them. They are all very good and this one does go deeper than others. However, compare it to series they did on Reece. Reece's father was an Olympic coach but never pushed him into the sport and never even told Reece he wrestled until his son was in junior high. Then look at how Kolat was abused as a child by a father who never wrestled. Both wrestled for the US in the world championships. Was Kolat better - yes. Was it worth it - no. As a father it makes me sick to see how Kolat was treated in Episode 1, it was still a good show. My concern is that younger kids or some parents will watch it and miss the point. I see a FEW parents at most youth tournaments who I could envision taking the wrong thing away from it.
  10. Anyone else watch the Kolat video part 1 on Flowrestling and just come away thinking "I hope no kids or parents think that was a good idea." I know its not their job to spell it out for people, but what his dad was doing to him was horrible. Kolat says a couple times "that was the worst thing I could have done" by just writing down his goals as an 8 year old, but I am afraid people will skip by that and think that's how you make a champion. I see the comments on there saying how much it motivated people to go work out and think they are missing the point.
  11. Obviously this is none of anyone's business but if you care to answer this, great. What are the benefits of the new school and what were the main reason's for the decision? It is just rare to see kids with an opportunity to win a state championship choose not to for any reason. If it is for an academic reason that he hopes to pursue, that is great to see him put everything in perspective and have the guts to pick a different path.
  12. Flo wrestling podcast really talks up Purdue's program after Griffin Parriot calls in to announce his decision to commit there. He mentions a couple other big names will sign with Purdue. Shawn Streck is mentioned as a possible future Boiler. http://www.flowrestling.org/coverage/251957-Flowrestling-Radio-Live/article/32360-Flo-Radio-Archive-Griffin-Parriott-Announces-College-Decision#.VZ498M9VhBc
  13. There is a 50 minute interview with Reece on Short Time Wrestling Podcast this week. Talks a little about Indiana wrestling and mentions quite a few names of former Indiana greats. Definately worth the time to listen.
  14. Here's how I could be pursuaded to think this might work. First, every freestyle tournament must require the kids to wrestle greco also. If that works, then the format should go to 4 periods in high school. 1st period greco, 2nd period freestyle, then 3 and 4th period we go to the coin flip and choice of top or bottom.
  15. Just a couple scenarios/questions. You coach at a school where half the kids start wrestling in middle school or high school. While freestyle may be easier to teach, do you want a kid who is just starting wrestling to compete against a state level wrestler in free-style or folkstyle? I am sure they will take their lumps in either style, but folkstyle just seems safer and less likely to get someone hurt or parents scared to death. This is also why I think free style is for the elite kids because they know what to expect and how defend themselves better than a kid off the street. If the idea is to wrestle multiple styles, how easy is that to teach a new kid? Ok, now you can lock your hands except the next match it will be a penalty. Now you should lay on your stomach on bottom and just try not to get turned, and on Tuesday you need to try to escape. Not to even mention greco. I still don't think parents and kids would understand it. One of the reasons I saw listed a lot when Olympic wrestling was almost lost was that people didn't understand the rules. This would be rampant with multiple styles.
  16. I guess I don't understand how you can change the rules to not be an Olympic replica and still think in some way it helps. To me it either includes the higher altitude throws for more points and mimics Olympic style, or you might as well wrestle folkstyle. It makes more sense if you are talking about push outs, but is that really where the other countries are beating us? I am not saying kids shouldn't wrestle free-style in the summer, I just don't think you are going to find a place for it during the high school season for the masses. Of course the Olympic coaches think you should wrestle freestyle. College coaches probably love it also because that's where the very best in the country wrestle. I am just saying anything you would think resembles freestyle wrestling probably won't work in high school where you are begging football players to try it for a letter. Some have mentioned both free style and folkstyle during the high school season - can you imagine the confusion parents would have with that? Most can't wrap their mind around folkstyle.
  17. Just a couple counter points for consideration. How are you going to sell FS or Greco to school systems who already worry about insurance costs? Hey come watch this kid who started wrestling last month try to 5 point throw everyone OR come watch your son who just started wrestling get launched as high as possible. I think folkstyle is just safer in general and less shocking to parents/kids who aren't familiar with it. Freestyle works for advanced kids who are generally the only ones doing it. It seems like the US has been competing pretty well at the cadet level internationally as of late. Maybe US wrestlers are advancing in technique (note all the high school kids knocking off senior level wrestlers) because technique is more available through the interwebs or because more young kids are training with elite senior level guys. Maybe we are catching up already and wrestling folkstyle isn't that bad in high school after all. Maybe we just need to change how we train to the way the other countries have been forever.
  18. I knew it was too much to ask people to read about brain injuries caused by a sport some of you guys coach to youth players and have kids playing. You guys are right, I was really out there on that one and apologize for that. I played and wasn't injured so that should be good enough I guess. You shouldn't read or think about stuff like that - it's a waste of time. I think I get it now - won't happen to your kid anyway if they don't head hunt and use proper technique. Makes perfect sense. Wait, how did those 4,500 former NFL players with brain injuries and dimentia get $765 million when it was their fault for head hunting and not using proper technique? And too bad the NFL won't have to release their internal files on what they knew about brain injuries but lied about. They just want to take care of those old NFL veterans who had really bad technique I guess. http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap1000000235494/article/settlement-reached-in-nfl-concussion-lawsuit
  19. I came on stronger than I thought I would when I started on this. The only way to make football safer is to limit contact. NFL teams are now going very light contact for the whole training camp and are headed toward no contact practices/camps. That would make it much more acceptable to me. New equipment and technique have nothing to do with limiting concussions though. It's a huge discussion that has to do with the brain moving inside the skull - you don't have to get hit in the head (be a head hunter) to get a concussion, you just have to change speeds enough (hit) to have your brain slosh around. I just suggest that parents read articles like the one Purdue did a few years ago where it showed you don't have to have concussions to mess up your brain - the kids who got concussions and sat out were better off for brain functioning than those who didn't get a concussion because the sub-concussive hits are as bad or worse. I don't care if your kid plays, just think parents should really know what is really going on because the damage is permanent and in a very high percentage. Again, I know every sport has concussions but one is so much worse than the others that it isn't the same comparison. I know some people would rather not read real studies about the topic than have their kid stop playing the sport. I just disagree with that approach.
  20. "In every physical sport there risks of injury short and long term....you land just right on a takedown and boom no more walking for you...guess we shouldnt support wrestling either..." I totally agree with the first part, but that is a dumb lazy argument if you look at the facts of what football does to you compared to any other sport. All I am saying is that if people knew how much worse football is for you than other sports, I don't think they would want their kid doing it. "Same with football, If you have proper technique and try not to be a meat head you'll be fine. People that feel bad about football and will never let their kids play usually feel that way b/c of poor choices that they made, not what the sport did to them." Another totally not true assumption there. I played football and wrestled. I liked both. I now know how bad football is for you and don't want my kid to play. I do hope other people remain ignorant so I can enjoy watching the sport. There is a reason the NFL is currently being sued by 2,000 former players for brain injuries. I don't know a guy who know's them, but I do know how to read about it. There is no proper technique to stop your brain from moving inside your head when you hit something. I know that happens in every sport, but do a little research and you will see one sport is much worse than the others.
  21. I don't think of it as an "eye for an eye" approach, I think if as protecting kids from a very dangerous sport. I loved football as a kid, I just don't want my kids playing it now that there is so much known about how bad it is for kid's brains. I know there are some people who play who never see the affects, but there is a disturbing number of kids who are going to have trouble later in life. Take the time to look at a simplified presentation of a study by Purdue (will have to click next at top of page) and tell me it is good for kids to play football - http://www.purdue.edu/differencemakers/nauman.html
  22. What do you think of discouraging wrestlers ( or all kids ) from playing football? Football is very detrimental to developing brains and as damaging as letting your child compete in boxing. I like to watch pro football, but would not feel good about coaching kids in a sport that is as potentially damaging as football.
  23. They don't want to - as alluded to by the all-american list above. Unless you are placing in Fargo or other national tournaments, they will value other state's studs over Indiana. Purdue seems to be interested in IN kids but as much as I hope that works out for them, I can't say it really looks promising. Neither IU or Purdue has a good enough coach to get them out of the cellar of the Big 10. My college coach was an Indiana state champ and wrestled at Indiana State and basically laughed when I tried to tell him Indiana had some kids who could help the team. He would rather have kids who were regional placers from PA. I still think he was wrong, but what's stopping Indiana kids from walking on at IU and proving them wrong?
  24. Bill was an incredible coach and even better person. He had a huge influence on the way I look at and understand wrestling. I was able to walk on to a division 1 team because of the technique I learned from him and was disappointed to find my college coach knew very little compared to Bill. I still consider him the best wrestler I have ever had the privilege of wrestling with even though it was only in practice. Any list of all time greats on this board that doesn't include him is ignorant of how good he was.
  25. It is great that old guys get mentioned on here, but I don't think you realize how much the sport has changed since 1989. I wrestled Ellis and maybe he was having a bad day, but I would pick Brooks to win 9 out of 10 times. In my opinion Ellis was special for what he could do back then, but even then it was not something that worked as well beyond Indiana. Again - my opinion, but people ran away from him back then which led to lesser competition in the state. I am not a Brooks fan either, I just can't deny that someone who has won national level tournaments today would beat someone from 1989.
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