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Perseverance

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  1. Like
    Perseverance got a reaction from Mattyb in USA Wrestling Magazine Scholastic All-Americans   
    Congratulations to Silas Allred, Joseph Walker and Alec Viduya on becoming USA Wrestling Magazine Scholastic All-Americans. 
    Exercising as much effort in the classroom as you do in a particular sport opens up so many more doors of opportunity. In a sport like like wrestling, where scholarship dollars are highly coveted and extremely limited, the ability to offset the investment of athletic money with academic money is a huge advantage for would-be recruits. It should also be recognized that consistency of effort in the classroom and into growing your character, demonstrates well rounded drive & effort....not just a one dimensional talent in a particular sport. Coaches and other recruiters recognize this dynamic, and feel much safer investing in these type of athletes. 
    So make sure you don’t get lost in the guise of “wins & losses” on the mat. Have the foresight to recognize how winning on your biology or calculus final can equally impact your goals. Even the often unnoticed effort of smiling at a stranger, being a friend to the kid sitting by themselves at lunch, etc., will assist in all your collective aspirations.  Make your goals first to be a good human, then a great student, and lastly an elite athlete. 100% effort into that priority line will take you to places many feel aren’t possible. 

  2. Like
    Perseverance got a reaction from rdrodd1 in USA Wrestling Magazine Scholastic All-Americans   
    Congratulations to Silas Allred, Joseph Walker and Alec Viduya on becoming USA Wrestling Magazine Scholastic All-Americans. 
    Exercising as much effort in the classroom as you do in a particular sport opens up so many more doors of opportunity. In a sport like like wrestling, where scholarship dollars are highly coveted and extremely limited, the ability to offset the investment of athletic money with academic money is a huge advantage for would-be recruits. It should also be recognized that consistency of effort in the classroom and into growing your character, demonstrates well rounded drive & effort....not just a one dimensional talent in a particular sport. Coaches and other recruiters recognize this dynamic, and feel much safer investing in these type of athletes. 
    So make sure you don’t get lost in the guise of “wins & losses” on the mat. Have the foresight to recognize how winning on your biology or calculus final can equally impact your goals. Even the often unnoticed effort of smiling at a stranger, being a friend to the kid sitting by themselves at lunch, etc., will assist in all your collective aspirations.  Make your goals first to be a good human, then a great student, and lastly an elite athlete. 100% effort into that priority line will take you to places many feel aren’t possible. 

  3. Like
    Perseverance got a reaction from FCFIGHTER170 in USA Wrestling Magazine Scholastic All-Americans   
    Congratulations to Silas Allred, Joseph Walker and Alec Viduya on becoming USA Wrestling Magazine Scholastic All-Americans. 
    Exercising as much effort in the classroom as you do in a particular sport opens up so many more doors of opportunity. In a sport like like wrestling, where scholarship dollars are highly coveted and extremely limited, the ability to offset the investment of athletic money with academic money is a huge advantage for would-be recruits. It should also be recognized that consistency of effort in the classroom and into growing your character, demonstrates well rounded drive & effort....not just a one dimensional talent in a particular sport. Coaches and other recruiters recognize this dynamic, and feel much safer investing in these type of athletes. 
    So make sure you don’t get lost in the guise of “wins & losses” on the mat. Have the foresight to recognize how winning on your biology or calculus final can equally impact your goals. Even the often unnoticed effort of smiling at a stranger, being a friend to the kid sitting by themselves at lunch, etc., will assist in all your collective aspirations.  Make your goals first to be a good human, then a great student, and lastly an elite athlete. 100% effort into that priority line will take you to places many feel aren’t possible. 

  4. Like
    Perseverance reacted to davecloud in Hoosier Scholastic Wrestlers named NWCA/USMC Leadership & Character All-Americans   
    Congratulations to all of our Indiana high school wrestlers named NWCA/USMC Leadership & Character All-Americans. You can check out the names at the link below. The National Wrestling Coaches Association is proud to partner with the United States Marine Corps to recognize achievement in academics (Scholar All-Americans) and leadership & character. We had a good number of Indiana wrestlers who were named Leadership & Character All-Americans this year.
     
    Next year I hope we can greatly increase the number of Scholar and Leadership & Character All-Americans from Indiana. I encourage you to make this Leadership & Character award a special recognition for those truly outstanding members of your team. If you look at the criteria (below), the award is meant to represent the very best of your program. 
     
    Congratulations to all of these wrestlers.
     
    http://www.nwcaonline.com/awards/nwca_usmc_leadership_character_aa_award/
     

  5. Like
    Perseverance got a reaction from maligned in USA Wrestling Magazine Scholastic All-Americans   
    Congratulations to Silas Allred, Joseph Walker and Alec Viduya on becoming USA Wrestling Magazine Scholastic All-Americans. 
    Exercising as much effort in the classroom as you do in a particular sport opens up so many more doors of opportunity. In a sport like like wrestling, where scholarship dollars are highly coveted and extremely limited, the ability to offset the investment of athletic money with academic money is a huge advantage for would-be recruits. It should also be recognized that consistency of effort in the classroom and into growing your character, demonstrates well rounded drive & effort....not just a one dimensional talent in a particular sport. Coaches and other recruiters recognize this dynamic, and feel much safer investing in these type of athletes. 
    So make sure you don’t get lost in the guise of “wins & losses” on the mat. Have the foresight to recognize how winning on your biology or calculus final can equally impact your goals. Even the often unnoticed effort of smiling at a stranger, being a friend to the kid sitting by themselves at lunch, etc., will assist in all your collective aspirations.  Make your goals first to be a good human, then a great student, and lastly an elite athlete. 100% effort into that priority line will take you to places many feel aren’t possible. 

  6. Like
    Perseverance got a reaction from Indysportsfan in USA Wrestling Magazine Scholastic All-Americans   
    Congratulations to Silas Allred, Joseph Walker and Alec Viduya on becoming USA Wrestling Magazine Scholastic All-Americans. 
    Exercising as much effort in the classroom as you do in a particular sport opens up so many more doors of opportunity. In a sport like like wrestling, where scholarship dollars are highly coveted and extremely limited, the ability to offset the investment of athletic money with academic money is a huge advantage for would-be recruits. It should also be recognized that consistency of effort in the classroom and into growing your character, demonstrates well rounded drive & effort....not just a one dimensional talent in a particular sport. Coaches and other recruiters recognize this dynamic, and feel much safer investing in these type of athletes. 
    So make sure you don’t get lost in the guise of “wins & losses” on the mat. Have the foresight to recognize how winning on your biology or calculus final can equally impact your goals. Even the often unnoticed effort of smiling at a stranger, being a friend to the kid sitting by themselves at lunch, etc., will assist in all your collective aspirations.  Make your goals first to be a good human, then a great student, and lastly an elite athlete. 100% effort into that priority line will take you to places many feel aren’t possible. 

  7. Like
    Perseverance got a reaction from badpta in USA Wrestling Magazine Scholastic All-Americans   
    Congratulations to Silas Allred, Joseph Walker and Alec Viduya on becoming USA Wrestling Magazine Scholastic All-Americans. 
    Exercising as much effort in the classroom as you do in a particular sport opens up so many more doors of opportunity. In a sport like like wrestling, where scholarship dollars are highly coveted and extremely limited, the ability to offset the investment of athletic money with academic money is a huge advantage for would-be recruits. It should also be recognized that consistency of effort in the classroom and into growing your character, demonstrates well rounded drive & effort....not just a one dimensional talent in a particular sport. Coaches and other recruiters recognize this dynamic, and feel much safer investing in these type of athletes. 
    So make sure you don’t get lost in the guise of “wins & losses” on the mat. Have the foresight to recognize how winning on your biology or calculus final can equally impact your goals. Even the often unnoticed effort of smiling at a stranger, being a friend to the kid sitting by themselves at lunch, etc., will assist in all your collective aspirations.  Make your goals first to be a good human, then a great student, and lastly an elite athlete. 100% effort into that priority line will take you to places many feel aren’t possible. 

  8. Like
    Perseverance got a reaction from Jerry Delk in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    In all fairness....I think Silas has solidified himself as a pretty special talent regardless of school size.  So with all do respect, I genuinely feel to draw a question about why aren’t more 1A or 2A wrestlers like him, is a bit unfair. Almost as unfair as if I asked why aren’t more 4A wrestlers like him.
     
    Admittedly....I certainly don’t have the answers regarding pros/cons of class wrestling.  I think there’s evidence of beneficial dynamics on both sides.  The class question is always intriguing to me because comparisons are frequently made to other power states whose classed (PA, Ill, IA, OH, etc).  But I question these comparisons as it pertains to the benefits of classing Indiana.  In other words....if those states weren’t classed, would they not be as strong?  I personally feel their strengths are elsewhere apart from the classification system. 
    Specifically....their head start in club training, and especially collegiate RTC opportunities. Most notably in PA.  In PA alone there are 11 D1 wrestling programs, 8 D2, and 14 D3.  This equates to NEVER having to drive too far down the road to get your butt kicked for 2hrs.  And in my experience, that dynamic coupled with an athletes desire to close the gap....is the biggest catalyst in the evolving of more nationally elite kids.  And unfortunately....class or no class, at this point.....only a handful of young athletes are driven enough to embrace a “Get beat up, or get better” mentality.  In fact, classing things in hopes to raise 1A numbers, kinda caters to many of those athletes who are hesitant to compete because of that fear.  If numbers is the only goal, then classing definitely benefits.  But I’m confident that strictly more bodies on the mat isn’t the zeal motivating class wrestling advocates.
     
    I’m fully aware that more participation will undoubtedly eventually mold some freak athlete whose a football player at the small school level into a great wrestler.  But what about the “in-betweens”.  The guys who literally just lack the drive, and want the accolades without the effort.  That’s one of my biggest issues with classing it here.  And full transparency......I’m definitely bias by what I’ve personally experienced at the small school level, in contrast to having graduated and competed athletically myself at Muncie Central. 
     
    The Silas scenario is 100% the embodiment of hard work and extreme levels of self motivation. For 2 years, his daily partner was a 160lb’er.....and a true 170 wrestling up to benefit our team. So having a no excuse mentality.....we had to find partners, supplental/paid clinicians for live wrestling, stance and motion in live match format for 5 periods, old school Rocky like strength training, and literally driving anywhere & everywhere in the off-season....to ensure he’d taste humility and have to overcome a peak to close a gap.  Ultimately....it’s simply been a mantra of “Nobody will outwork me”.  That alone excited the recruiters.  Silas’ ceiling hasn’t even been close to established. He’s never had regular elite partners to push him.  He’s a product of self-push, and an overwhelming desire to succeed.
     
    In fact, the argument could made.....that Silas is the example of what’s possible at the 1A level.  When you simply don’t make excuses about school size, strength of schedule, partners, etc.  And just literally make it a lifestyle.  Daily telling yourself....I’m going to be better today than I was yesterday. 
     
    Again....I don’t have all the answers.  And I respect the opinion of those whose researched the benefits.  I’m just simply sharing what I know to be truth in the lives of my son Silas, and his overzealous dad who fell in love with sport a mere 6 yrs ago. 🤷🏻‍♂️  
     
    That said......will classing create more elite athletes?  I can’t buy in.
     
    But will it raise numbers and help even more young men become better men?  I’m sold on that.
  9. Like
    Perseverance reacted to RASSLER4LIFE in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    I can attest to the fact that Shenandoah had a special group but it wasn’t without hard work, dedication and buy in. My son was the varsity coach, and although he had had success in small doses, he didn’t have solid coaches at the junior high level so the deck was stacked twice against him. Coach Slivka and I stepped in as junior high coaches. The boys were given a vision and we convinced them they could compete and compete at a high level. To re-enforce that we went and wrestled against teams from Warren, Center Grove, Yorktown and the likes and it confirmed what we were “selling”. We focused on basics and fell in line with what the varsity coach was teaching at the high school level. In the end, thru “buy in”, hard work and never being “out of season” we reaped the benefits. It helped to have parents like myself and Coach Slivka that had a vested interest in having a solid team for our boys. We traveled to open rooms in Indy, went to Humphrey’s and opened our room to all-comers, we wrestled in multiple states(all on the cheap) many times having 5-6 kids in one hotel room. The road to success always travels thru hard work, getting “buying in”, implementing a system and good coaches throughout the entire organization.
            Silas is a rare athlete as were a few others within our program but some were not nearly considered athletically gifted. Guys like Josh Gee, Ryan Surguy, Dallas Pugsley worked off season along with Silas, Aj, Hayden and Jordan to get to the level they achieved. We didn’t spend thousands, we carpooled, set up fundraisers to off-set costs and we had fun together. At the end of the day, these boys worked hard, sometimes 4X per week. It didn’t come without them being self motivated, working hard and believing in themselves. I am proud to have been a part of the success we had collectively as a team and coaching staff. 
  10. Haha
    Perseverance reacted to TeamGarcia in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    we got another @3xStateChamp @MikeTython or @donniebaker on our hands here fellas !  
     
    We need Indianamat celebrity poster rankings, classed wrestling poster of course . I’ve would have to ranking them by “Deadliest” 
     
    1. Pistol Pete - he’ll shoot you dead 
    2. Mike Tython - put on the right son by Phil Collins it’s lights out 
    3. Bill Walton - that dude will talk your head off “literally” 
    4. Donnie Baker - that mullet will Cut you with a flick of his head . 
  11. Haha
    Perseverance reacted to Wrestling Bill Walton in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    Silas is the best wrestler in the  History of Indiana Wrestling.   But I wouldn't put him above Escobedo, Tsirtsis, and Howe.   Those guys were the greatest.   Im saying Mount Rushmore brothers,  Rock N Roll hall of fame level.   Mason Paris, he also is the Indiana greatest wrestler all time.     Oh yea,  whats this got to do with Class wrestling?
     
    Class wrestling has its problems,  Yea,  I love giving a lot  awards out for effort.   But you got to look at the big picture, the whole thing is better when its all one family.   Compare it to the Grateful Dead,   some of the members were bigger than others and maybe in a different class.   Jerry Garcia was big, and a huge musician like 4A, but the other members were 1A and 2a.  But you put the band together,  they all contributed and were bigger than the whole, and best of all time.  Yea,  take Ohio,   its parts are better than all the Indiana parts.   But  when you divide them up,  its not as good as Indiana. Ohio is like Creedence Clearwater, the greatest band in history of Western Civilization.  Then John Fogarty leaves,  they're still good,  but not great.  Its  like classed Ohio wrestling.    
  12. Like
    Perseverance reacted to base in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    Sometimes there is a circumstance where a few parents in a community come together for the common purpose of advancing the abilities of their kids.  Silas has been talked about a lot on this thread, but keep in mind that coming up through the tiny Shenandoah system, they had at one time formed a group of extremely talented wrestlers including both Slivka boys, AJ Black, Hayden Lohrey, and I am sure I am missing some others that Mr Allred could fill in.  I don't know the story of when or how they all got together, but for both large and small schools, I think it is a powerful trend when you see a "wave" of kids around the same age getting after it in the offseason and feeding off of each other's accomplishments.
     
    May have been a similar circumstance with Hanover Central.  I can remember Union County had a few seasons with multiple state placers also.
  13. Like
    Perseverance reacted to bbulldog152 in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    I agree with this statement, however Silas didn't just compete against guys his own weight... He dominated. Every win by pin this season, less than 10 wins in his career didn't end in pin only 2 career losses ranked number 2 in the nation. When he's all said and done who know's what else he's going to accomplish. I'm sure there's not many NCAA all-Americans or National Champs that come from a public school the size of Shanendoah, Both thing's that can be accomplished. I'm not saying both accomplishments are on the same level just saying they're similar ideas.
  14. Like
    Perseverance reacted to Wrestling Bill Walton in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    That's outstanding brother.   That's like the 18th best post ever on Indianamat.  That reminds we when John Wooden,  the greatest coach in western  civilization,  and only 2nd to coaches like Dan Gable and Cael Sanderson said to me.  "Things turn out best for the people  who make the best the way things turn out".
  15. Thanks
    Perseverance reacted to TeamGarcia in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    2 Days in a row I’ve read posts that are on 🔥! Love it 
  16. Thanks
    Perseverance reacted to bbulldog152 in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    I don't think he's directly comparing it to size he's comparing the disadvantage. The idea that someone that is 5'3" competing in the NBA is similar to some one coming from a small school and being has accomplished as Allred. The both over come obstacles and it's not common for this 2 situations happen and you can't say that just anyone can accomplish these task. At least that's how I read it and maybe I'm wrong. The point is Allred's accomplishments are out of this world and a testament of his hard work and not just anybody can duplicate what he has done.
  17. Like
    Perseverance got a reaction from indianmorg in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    Actually.....kind of, yes.  But not in that articulated way.  You simply help them develop a mindset that breaks the “small town mentality” of “It can never happen to me”.  You encourage them to set their goals ridiculously high....then spill their guts every day to accomplish them.  Urge them to never make excuses, work as hard in life & the classroom as they do in the sport.  Teach them that wins & losses don’t define them....their response does.  Build them up in the reality that they can accomplish anything.
     
    And at the end of the day......when/if they fall short of those goals, reiterate to them they haven’t failed.  Encourage them to look around.....because they still will have accomplished more that 98% of everyone else.  And 100% of those who fear failure.
  18. Like
    Perseverance got a reaction from pritchem in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    In all fairness....I think Silas has solidified himself as a pretty special talent regardless of school size.  So with all do respect, I genuinely feel to draw a question about why aren’t more 1A or 2A wrestlers like him, is a bit unfair. Almost as unfair as if I asked why aren’t more 4A wrestlers like him.
     
    Admittedly....I certainly don’t have the answers regarding pros/cons of class wrestling.  I think there’s evidence of beneficial dynamics on both sides.  The class question is always intriguing to me because comparisons are frequently made to other power states whose classed (PA, Ill, IA, OH, etc).  But I question these comparisons as it pertains to the benefits of classing Indiana.  In other words....if those states weren’t classed, would they not be as strong?  I personally feel their strengths are elsewhere apart from the classification system. 
    Specifically....their head start in club training, and especially collegiate RTC opportunities. Most notably in PA.  In PA alone there are 11 D1 wrestling programs, 8 D2, and 14 D3.  This equates to NEVER having to drive too far down the road to get your butt kicked for 2hrs.  And in my experience, that dynamic coupled with an athletes desire to close the gap....is the biggest catalyst in the evolving of more nationally elite kids.  And unfortunately....class or no class, at this point.....only a handful of young athletes are driven enough to embrace a “Get beat up, or get better” mentality.  In fact, classing things in hopes to raise 1A numbers, kinda caters to many of those athletes who are hesitant to compete because of that fear.  If numbers is the only goal, then classing definitely benefits.  But I’m confident that strictly more bodies on the mat isn’t the zeal motivating class wrestling advocates.
     
    I’m fully aware that more participation will undoubtedly eventually mold some freak athlete whose a football player at the small school level into a great wrestler.  But what about the “in-betweens”.  The guys who literally just lack the drive, and want the accolades without the effort.  That’s one of my biggest issues with classing it here.  And full transparency......I’m definitely bias by what I’ve personally experienced at the small school level, in contrast to having graduated and competed athletically myself at Muncie Central. 
     
    The Silas scenario is 100% the embodiment of hard work and extreme levels of self motivation. For 2 years, his daily partner was a 160lb’er.....and a true 170 wrestling up to benefit our team. So having a no excuse mentality.....we had to find partners, supplental/paid clinicians for live wrestling, stance and motion in live match format for 5 periods, old school Rocky like strength training, and literally driving anywhere & everywhere in the off-season....to ensure he’d taste humility and have to overcome a peak to close a gap.  Ultimately....it’s simply been a mantra of “Nobody will outwork me”.  That alone excited the recruiters.  Silas’ ceiling hasn’t even been close to established. He’s never had regular elite partners to push him.  He’s a product of self-push, and an overwhelming desire to succeed.
     
    In fact, the argument could made.....that Silas is the example of what’s possible at the 1A level.  When you simply don’t make excuses about school size, strength of schedule, partners, etc.  And just literally make it a lifestyle.  Daily telling yourself....I’m going to be better today than I was yesterday. 
     
    Again....I don’t have all the answers.  And I respect the opinion of those whose researched the benefits.  I’m just simply sharing what I know to be truth in the lives of my son Silas, and his overzealous dad who fell in love with sport a mere 6 yrs ago. 🤷🏻‍♂️  
     
    That said......will classing create more elite athletes?  I can’t buy in.
     
    But will it raise numbers and help even more young men become better men?  I’m sold on that.
  19. Like
    Perseverance got a reaction from Coach Day in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    In all fairness....I think Silas has solidified himself as a pretty special talent regardless of school size.  So with all do respect, I genuinely feel to draw a question about why aren’t more 1A or 2A wrestlers like him, is a bit unfair. Almost as unfair as if I asked why aren’t more 4A wrestlers like him.
     
    Admittedly....I certainly don’t have the answers regarding pros/cons of class wrestling.  I think there’s evidence of beneficial dynamics on both sides.  The class question is always intriguing to me because comparisons are frequently made to other power states whose classed (PA, Ill, IA, OH, etc).  But I question these comparisons as it pertains to the benefits of classing Indiana.  In other words....if those states weren’t classed, would they not be as strong?  I personally feel their strengths are elsewhere apart from the classification system. 
    Specifically....their head start in club training, and especially collegiate RTC opportunities. Most notably in PA.  In PA alone there are 11 D1 wrestling programs, 8 D2, and 14 D3.  This equates to NEVER having to drive too far down the road to get your butt kicked for 2hrs.  And in my experience, that dynamic coupled with an athletes desire to close the gap....is the biggest catalyst in the evolving of more nationally elite kids.  And unfortunately....class or no class, at this point.....only a handful of young athletes are driven enough to embrace a “Get beat up, or get better” mentality.  In fact, classing things in hopes to raise 1A numbers, kinda caters to many of those athletes who are hesitant to compete because of that fear.  If numbers is the only goal, then classing definitely benefits.  But I’m confident that strictly more bodies on the mat isn’t the zeal motivating class wrestling advocates.
     
    I’m fully aware that more participation will undoubtedly eventually mold some freak athlete whose a football player at the small school level into a great wrestler.  But what about the “in-betweens”.  The guys who literally just lack the drive, and want the accolades without the effort.  That’s one of my biggest issues with classing it here.  And full transparency......I’m definitely bias by what I’ve personally experienced at the small school level, in contrast to having graduated and competed athletically myself at Muncie Central. 
     
    The Silas scenario is 100% the embodiment of hard work and extreme levels of self motivation. For 2 years, his daily partner was a 160lb’er.....and a true 170 wrestling up to benefit our team. So having a no excuse mentality.....we had to find partners, supplental/paid clinicians for live wrestling, stance and motion in live match format for 5 periods, old school Rocky like strength training, and literally driving anywhere & everywhere in the off-season....to ensure he’d taste humility and have to overcome a peak to close a gap.  Ultimately....it’s simply been a mantra of “Nobody will outwork me”.  That alone excited the recruiters.  Silas’ ceiling hasn’t even been close to established. He’s never had regular elite partners to push him.  He’s a product of self-push, and an overwhelming desire to succeed.
     
    In fact, the argument could made.....that Silas is the example of what’s possible at the 1A level.  When you simply don’t make excuses about school size, strength of schedule, partners, etc.  And just literally make it a lifestyle.  Daily telling yourself....I’m going to be better today than I was yesterday. 
     
    Again....I don’t have all the answers.  And I respect the opinion of those whose researched the benefits.  I’m just simply sharing what I know to be truth in the lives of my son Silas, and his overzealous dad who fell in love with sport a mere 6 yrs ago. 🤷🏻‍♂️  
     
    That said......will classing create more elite athletes?  I can’t buy in.
     
    But will it raise numbers and help even more young men become better men?  I’m sold on that.
  20. Like
    Perseverance got a reaction from LN89IU94 in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    I hear you brother.  And for clarity....my comments aren’t meant to be argumentative at all. Just additional perspective from individuals whose weathered the challenges of 1A wrestling, and relentlessly found a way to excel.  But I will say....that above mindset should be worked to be ingrained in the minds of athletes at all levels.  Because in my opinion, where your from, how much money you have, etc...should never be an excuse to not recklessly pursue your passions.
     
    And being fully transparent.....we’ve never had tons of money.  In fact, driving different locations for partners hurt the wallet a lot at times.  The numbers dynamic is the biggest “pro” in my mind towards classification. I mean....we couldn’t convince kids to wrestle when we were competing for Team State Championships 3 straight years! True story.  So again....just in my personal experience, I don’t think the opportunity for accolades will solve the problem either.
     
    But I can’t stress enough.....I don’t have the answers.  I simply just share what has worked for us, in hopes that other programs/coaches/wrestlers can realize they’re capable of accomplishing anything through effort, discipline, responsibility and accountability.  Because ultimately....I don’t think the IHSAA has any desire to change a thing man.  
  21. Like
    Perseverance got a reaction from LN89IU94 in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    Actually.....kind of, yes.  But not in that articulated way.  You simply help them develop a mindset that breaks the “small town mentality” of “It can never happen to me”.  You encourage them to set their goals ridiculously high....then spill their guts every day to accomplish them.  Urge them to never make excuses, work as hard in life & the classroom as they do in the sport.  Teach them that wins & losses don’t define them....their response does.  Build them up in the reality that they can accomplish anything.
     
    And at the end of the day......when/if they fall short of those goals, reiterate to them they haven’t failed.  Encourage them to look around.....because they still will have accomplished more that 98% of everyone else.  And 100% of those who fear failure.
  22. Like
    Perseverance got a reaction from LN89IU94 in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    In all fairness....I think Silas has solidified himself as a pretty special talent regardless of school size.  So with all do respect, I genuinely feel to draw a question about why aren’t more 1A or 2A wrestlers like him, is a bit unfair. Almost as unfair as if I asked why aren’t more 4A wrestlers like him.
     
    Admittedly....I certainly don’t have the answers regarding pros/cons of class wrestling.  I think there’s evidence of beneficial dynamics on both sides.  The class question is always intriguing to me because comparisons are frequently made to other power states whose classed (PA, Ill, IA, OH, etc).  But I question these comparisons as it pertains to the benefits of classing Indiana.  In other words....if those states weren’t classed, would they not be as strong?  I personally feel their strengths are elsewhere apart from the classification system. 
    Specifically....their head start in club training, and especially collegiate RTC opportunities. Most notably in PA.  In PA alone there are 11 D1 wrestling programs, 8 D2, and 14 D3.  This equates to NEVER having to drive too far down the road to get your butt kicked for 2hrs.  And in my experience, that dynamic coupled with an athletes desire to close the gap....is the biggest catalyst in the evolving of more nationally elite kids.  And unfortunately....class or no class, at this point.....only a handful of young athletes are driven enough to embrace a “Get beat up, or get better” mentality.  In fact, classing things in hopes to raise 1A numbers, kinda caters to many of those athletes who are hesitant to compete because of that fear.  If numbers is the only goal, then classing definitely benefits.  But I’m confident that strictly more bodies on the mat isn’t the zeal motivating class wrestling advocates.
     
    I’m fully aware that more participation will undoubtedly eventually mold some freak athlete whose a football player at the small school level into a great wrestler.  But what about the “in-betweens”.  The guys who literally just lack the drive, and want the accolades without the effort.  That’s one of my biggest issues with classing it here.  And full transparency......I’m definitely bias by what I’ve personally experienced at the small school level, in contrast to having graduated and competed athletically myself at Muncie Central. 
     
    The Silas scenario is 100% the embodiment of hard work and extreme levels of self motivation. For 2 years, his daily partner was a 160lb’er.....and a true 170 wrestling up to benefit our team. So having a no excuse mentality.....we had to find partners, supplental/paid clinicians for live wrestling, stance and motion in live match format for 5 periods, old school Rocky like strength training, and literally driving anywhere & everywhere in the off-season....to ensure he’d taste humility and have to overcome a peak to close a gap.  Ultimately....it’s simply been a mantra of “Nobody will outwork me”.  That alone excited the recruiters.  Silas’ ceiling hasn’t even been close to established. He’s never had regular elite partners to push him.  He’s a product of self-push, and an overwhelming desire to succeed.
     
    In fact, the argument could made.....that Silas is the example of what’s possible at the 1A level.  When you simply don’t make excuses about school size, strength of schedule, partners, etc.  And just literally make it a lifestyle.  Daily telling yourself....I’m going to be better today than I was yesterday. 
     
    Again....I don’t have all the answers.  And I respect the opinion of those whose researched the benefits.  I’m just simply sharing what I know to be truth in the lives of my son Silas, and his overzealous dad who fell in love with sport a mere 6 yrs ago. 🤷🏻‍♂️  
     
    That said......will classing create more elite athletes?  I can’t buy in.
     
    But will it raise numbers and help even more young men become better men?  I’m sold on that.
  23. Like
    Perseverance got a reaction from TeamGarcia in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    Actually.....kind of, yes.  But not in that articulated way.  You simply help them develop a mindset that breaks the “small town mentality” of “It can never happen to me”.  You encourage them to set their goals ridiculously high....then spill their guts every day to accomplish them.  Urge them to never make excuses, work as hard in life & the classroom as they do in the sport.  Teach them that wins & losses don’t define them....their response does.  Build them up in the reality that they can accomplish anything.
     
    And at the end of the day......when/if they fall short of those goals, reiterate to them they haven’t failed.  Encourage them to look around.....because they still will have accomplished more that 98% of everyone else.  And 100% of those who fear failure.
  24. Like
    Perseverance got a reaction from bomber_bob in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    Actually.....kind of, yes.  But not in that articulated way.  You simply help them develop a mindset that breaks the “small town mentality” of “It can never happen to me”.  You encourage them to set their goals ridiculously high....then spill their guts every day to accomplish them.  Urge them to never make excuses, work as hard in life & the classroom as they do in the sport.  Teach them that wins & losses don’t define them....their response does.  Build them up in the reality that they can accomplish anything.
     
    And at the end of the day......when/if they fall short of those goals, reiterate to them they haven’t failed.  Encourage them to look around.....because they still will have accomplished more that 98% of everyone else.  And 100% of those who fear failure.
  25. Thanks
    Perseverance reacted to Ahawkeye in State tournament class statistics to not necessarily incite class wrestling discussion   
    I don't think it could be said any better than this, absolutely perfect 100%. An addition to these points is that there are so few people willing to give everything they have to achieve their goals. In my opinion Silas may have had a goal to win State but I'm pretty sure his goals are WAY higher than that. Look at all of the state champs in any given year regardless of where they came from or where they're going they put a ton of work into their goals, if any individual wants it bad enough there will be a way and they will find that way. 
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