Jump to content
jason

Lifting in season

Recommended Posts

My son is lifting after practice daily..alternating upper and lower body. Will this help or hinder his performance if he does this throughout the season as well?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everybody is different.. myself I lifted during season but not really heavy... enough to maintain what i developed in the summer. PECK had us do millions of air squats during practice and he did awesome incorporating exercises that were weighted but were exercises that developed things specific to wrestling. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, jason said:

My son is lifting after practice daily..alternating upper and lower body. Will this help or hinder his performance if he does this throughout the season as well?

Jason.......as FCFighter indicated, everyone responds differently. Especially when factoring body types, genetics and other variables that should accompany any type of strength training regiment (in or offseason).  Specifically......sport specific exercises, diet, additional supplementation, tons of stretching, and most importantly adequate rest.

For my son Silas.....continued in season weight training has worked well.  However, we really transition from heavier lifts, to sets of no more than 60-70% of his max for higher reps.  We’ll also only do so 2 days a week.....in contrast to a full 5-6 days during National Season.  

With Silas being young for his class (literally a grade ahead of where he could be).....strength gains were essential early on to ensure he didn’t get bullied on the mat. So we began the summer before his 8th grade year and haven’t looked back.  We started supplementing with 100% whey protein in 8th grade to assist recovery.  That’s still a staple.  He began utilizing creatine his freshman year.....but we’ve switched to a supplement called Mass Impact (Advocare) which consists of a healthy/safe mix of creatine, glutamine and other essential amino’s.  His body has responded well.  Eating clean and allowing at least 48hrs rest between training muscle groups has been what’s worked best for him.  I’d highly recommend tons of plyometrics, agility/footwork drills, and medicine ball circuits to well round and help translate new strength towards technique.

I can assure you that there’s no “secret sauce” for wrestler development or success.  A young athlete just needs to embrace the philosophy of “nobody will outwork me” and apply it to every facet of their life to become the best version of themselves possible.  It sounds to me like you and your son are on that similar path.  So just allow his body, as well as his mental motivation and overall drive to be the determining factor of when to push harder.....and when to ease up.  It has to stay enjoyable.  Because with the amount of pain a young man has to endure to become elite....the perspective of “why” has to be a daily reminder.  For instance.....It’s not conditioning, it’s 3rd period preparation.  It’s not about wins & losses, it’s about becoming the best “you” possible.  If you train the psychological side equally as hard as the physical......the winning will take care of itself.  And in doing so, you’ll build in your son the type of attributes that will make him a champion at life.....not just a champion at wrestling.

This is the dynamic that’s worked well for us. Hopefully some of this info can help you and your son inch closer towards your own mutual goals as well.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Perseverance said:

Jason.......as FCFighter indicated, everyone responds differently. Especially when factoring body types, genetics and other variables that should accompany any type of strength training regiment (in or offseason).  Specifically......sport specific exercises, diet, additional supplementation, tons of stretching, and most importantly adequate rest.

For my son Silas.....continued in season weight training has worked well.  However, we really transition from heavier lifts, to sets of no more than 60-70% of his max for higher reps.  We’ll also only do so 2 days a week.....in contrast to a full 5-6 days during National Season.  

With Silas being young for his class (literally a grade ahead of where he could be).....strength gains were essential early on to ensure he didn’t get bullied on the mat. So we began the summer before his 8th grade year and haven’t looked back.  We started supplementing with 100% whey protein in 8th grade to assist recovery.  That’s still a staple.  He began utilizing creatine his freshman year.....but we’ve switched to a supplement called Mass Impact (Advocare) which consists of a healthy/safe mix of creatine, glutamine and other essential amino’s.  His body has responded well.  Eating clean and allowing at least 48hrs rest between training muscle groups has been what’s worked best for him.  I’d highly recommend tons of plyometrics, agility/footwork drills, and medicine ball circuits to well round and help translate new strength towards technique.

I can assure you that there’s no “secret sauce” for wrestler development or success.  A young athlete just needs to embrace the philosophy of “nobody will outwork me” and apply it to every facet of their life to become the best version of themselves possible.  It sounds to me like you and your son are on that similar path.  So just allow his body, as well as his mental motivation and overall drive to be the determining factor of when to push harder.....and when to ease up.  It has to stay enjoyable.  Because with the amount of pain a young man has to endure to become elite....the perspective of “why” has to be a daily reminder.  For instance.....It’s not conditioning, it’s 3rd period preparation.  It’s not about wins & losses, it’s about becoming the best “you” possible.  If you train the psychological side equally as hard as the physical......the winning will take care of itself.  And in doing so, you’ll build in your son the type of attributes that will make him a champion at life.....not just a champion at wrestling.

This is the dynamic that’s worked well for us. Hopefully some of this info can help you and your son inch closer towards your own mutual goals as well.  

Thanks perseverance...and thanks for your prayers..in my recent struggles 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just thought I would mention that you should extremely careful with cutting weight and using creatine.  I have heard it referenced every time when people discuss the 3 deaths that occurred in college in 1997 with wrestlers dehydrating while using creatine.  I cannot say it was the reason for the deaths, but I believe all 3 wrestlers were using it.  I personally would not let my son take it ever but that's just my opinion.  I am sure there are articles that say it is safe if you want to find them.  I just believe a healthy diet, maybe a multi-vitamin, and protein if you insist are probably more than enough.  I a lso should add that I am not a medical doctor, I just have just awarded myself a doctorate in wrestling for the years I have spent studying it.

https://www.nytimes.com/1997/12/19/sports/wrestling-collegiate-wrestling-deaths-raise-fears-about-training.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are really willing to put a little time into it, the Attack Style Wrestling podcast with Daryl Webber did a really good job of talking about strength training for wrestling.  He did a 3 part podcast series on it that was really good.  I found the second podcast in the series, but do a little searching and you can find the others.  I remember Weber ( NCAA champ at Iowa ) saying during the season he did very heavy lifts in sets of 1 to 3 to keep his explosiveness.  His guest is or was the strength coach for Rutgers - Even Esh.

https://www.mattalkonline.com/podcast/attack-style-wrestling/asw31-part-2-strength-training-for-wrestling-with-zach-even-esh/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, 84headhunter said:

lift for strength and muscle growth in the off season, during season lift for muscle endurance and to retain.

I thought you didn’t start lifting til after you graduated? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When my son was in high school he took weight lifting class all 4 years.  This way he got his lifting in during school hours every day.  During in season he focused mostly on doing lighter weight and more reps.  On meet days, he typically wouldn't lift at all.  I recommend for all athletes to take advantage of this class if offered at your school and your schedules can allow it to happen.  In the spring about 3 weeks to a month after season was over he had increased his strength and his max greatly each year after he wasn't worried about maintaining weight.  I believe that he didn't lose strength and that it in fact increased because he continued his weight lifting during season.  Just my 2 cents.......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I say this in a general sense, but if you lift in the off season and then do not during the season, you WILL lose strength and the benefits of the off season training. Just got to be sure to keep weight off. I believe what Perseverance mentioned he is doing with Silas is the way to go. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, WOC said:

When my son was in high school he took weight lifting class all 4 years.  This way he got his lifting in during school hours every day.  During in season he focused mostly on doing lighter weight and more reps.  On meet days, he typically wouldn't lift at all.  I recommend for all athletes to take advantage of this class if offered at your school and your schedules can allow it to happen.  In the spring about 3 weeks to a month after season was over he had increased his strength and his max greatly each year after he wasn't worried about maintaining weight.  I believe that he didn't lose strength and that it in fact increased because he continued his weight lifting during season.  Just my 2 cents.......

Thanks...he is doing low weight max.reps to failure

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was in high school I did a maintanance lifting program. Only lifted two times per week. Monday's were legs and back, Thursday was chest/biceps/triceps. Did not do shoulders because you work those enough in practice. Wednesday's were duals, Saturday's were either dual tournaments or individual tournaments. High reps, lower weight. The point was to maintain strength while cutting weight 

On top of that I did 10am practice on Sunday that was not ran by my wrestling program, it was a club. That way I got 5 days of wrestling in.

Never wrestled, ran, or lifted early in the morning unless absolutely necessary (weight cutting usually) because it is important to be on a schedule. By throwing one or two days of early practice or lifting you throw the body's sleep schedule off. When you're training a lot your body needs its sleep for recovery so overuse injuries don't occur. Go to bed at 11pm after studying, wake up at 7am, school at 7:40.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/8/2018 at 10:55 PM, Perseverance said:

Jason.......as FCFighter indicated, everyone responds differently. Especially when factoring body types, genetics and other variables that should accompany any type of strength training regiment (in or offseason).  Specifically......sport specific exercises, diet, additional supplementation, tons of stretching, and most importantly adequate rest.

For my son Silas.....continued in season weight training has worked well.  However, we really transition from heavier lifts, to sets of no more than 60-70% of his max for higher reps.  We’ll also only do so 2 days a week.....in contrast to a full 5-6 days during National Season.  

With Silas being young for his class (literally a grade ahead of where he could be).....strength gains were essential early on to ensure he didn’t get bullied on the mat. So we began the summer before his 8th grade year and haven’t looked back.  We started supplementing with 100% whey protein in 8th grade to assist recovery.  That’s still a staple.  He began utilizing creatine his freshman year.....but we’ve switched to a supplement called Mass Impact (Advocare) which consists of a healthy/safe mix of creatine, glutamine and other essential amino’s.  His body has responded well.  Eating clean and allowing at least 48hrs rest between training muscle groups has been what’s worked best for him.  I’d highly recommend tons of plyometrics, agility/footwork drills, and medicine ball circuits to well round and help translate new strength towards technique.

I can assure you that there’s no “secret sauce” for wrestler development or success.  A young athlete just needs to embrace the philosophy of “nobody will outwork me” and apply it to every facet of their life to become the best version of themselves possible.  It sounds to me like you and your son are on that similar path.  So just allow his body, as well as his mental motivation and overall drive to be the determining factor of when to push harder.....and when to ease up.  It has to stay enjoyable.  Because with the amount of pain a young man has to endure to become elite....the perspective of “why” has to be a daily reminder.  For instance.....It’s not conditioning, it’s 3rd period preparation.  It’s not about wins & losses, it’s about becoming the best “you” possible.  If you train the psychological side equally as hard as the physical......the winning will take care of itself.  And in doing so, you’ll build in your son the type of attributes that will make him a champion at life.....not just a champion at wrestling.

This is the dynamic that’s worked well for us. Hopefully some of this info can help you and your son inch closer towards your own mutual goals as well.  

Bingo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.